Blaming the EU is an easy way out. Leaving it would be bad for Britain | Left Foot Forward

English: (Green) the United Kingdom. (Light-gr...

English: (Green) the United Kingdom. (Light-green) The European Union (EU). (Grey) Europe. (Light-grey) The surrounding region. See also: Category:SVG locator maps of countries of Europe (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

European Union

European Union (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

This is a good article by Phillip Souter published in Left Foot Forward. It’s worth a read. Check it out!

Blaming the EU is an easy way out. Leaving it would be bad for Britain | Left Foot Forward.

With the increasing pressure for a UK referendum on the EC, it’s important to hear the other side of the argument.

Any thoughts?

via Blaming the EU is an easy way out. Leaving it would be bad for Britain | Left Foot Forward.

 

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8 responses

  1. Pingback: Indecision over the EU is damaging us all | Rodney Willett

  2. Pingback: My top six blogs – last week « Dr Alf's Blog

  3. Trade with Europe and indeed the rest of the world has always occurred without the need for trade tariffs and organizations which are really about control of trade by a minority. I would love to go to a foreign country and buy something without the customs duties imposed when trying to bring the item into the country.

    I am not arguing with your pro trade argument at all, but with the organizations that are stifling trade by regulation and profiting to boot. I also agree with the fact that Cameron will not get a suitable renegotiation, primarily because he is pro European and will bend to the powers of the “force”. Why do I say this, His promises of a referendum were cancelled as soon as he got into office and his statements over the past few days lambasting rebellious conservatives about leaving the EU and additionally, not forwarding the legislation for a referendum in the Queens speech.

    Thanks for your reply.

    • I think that we are not too far apart:

      *need for a good public debate on arguments both for and against leaving EU
      *let’s see what if anything that David Cameron can win from EU partners
      *proper costing and independent risk analysis of various policy options
      *appropriately worded referendum

  4. Whilst it is an absolute nonsense to blame the EU for the present economic situation, to determine the relationship between the UK and the EU on purely economic grounds is also a nonsense. There is more to life than that and the tensions that the EU have created – and look set to continue so doing – are a problem that needs to be addressed. From my stand point (and I would like to say in passing that I was the “yes” campaign coordinator for the constituency in which I then lived for the referendum on the EEC).I am entirely in favour of a free trade area. My problem is that there are forces driving towards a Federal State of Europe which I feel would be a mistake. In my blog today argue that we really must clear the air with a yes/no referendum. Some (and I am probably one) would prefer to lose some economic advantages (difficult to quantify and not done so with any great persuasion by any of the commentators to date) rather than become a minor state in a major federation which is where I feel we could be heading.

    BTW for the sake of accuracy I am a retired business consultant/freelance photo-journalist running the two side by side and not a teacher (not that I mind one little bit).

    • Rodney,

      I am pro-EU on trade but against it on bureaucracy and the move to federalism; I am not against a referendum. Like, Lord Lawson I do not rate David Cameron’s chances of renegotiating better terms for the UK. However, I believe that all policy options must be properly costed & risk assessed. So it seems our positions are not far apart?

      Thank you for clarifying that you are a retired business consultant/freelance photo-journalist running the two side by side and not a teacher

  5. I think we have been hearing the other side of the argument for over 60 years when the union was discussed and planned at Bilderberg. The BBC accepted funds to promote the EU during the Lisbon treaty debacle. Ireland had to have two votes because the first one didn’t give the right answer while Portugal, France and Holland and the UK were denied a say. Now a fund has been

    Now we need more education? More financial reasons on why to remain in and strengthen the union? Now we have the taxpayer funded Europe for Citizens scheme which aims to ‘develop understanding of the EU’. put forward in the Queens speech! No thanks.

    • Let me restate my position. I am pro-EU on trade but against it on bureaucracy and the move to federalism; I am not against a referendum. Like, Lord Lawson I do not rate David Cameron’s chances of renegotiating better terms for the UK.

      However, I agree with your last paragraph about the taxpayer funded Europe for Citizens scheme which aims to ‘develop understanding of the EU’.

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