Efforts to return British tourists from Sharm el-Sheikh descend into chaos as UK Government rebukes airlines | UK Politics | News | The Independent

According to the UK Independent newspaper, the effort to fly thousands of British holidaymakers home from Sharm el-Sheikh airport has descended into chaos as the UK Government rebuked airlines for sending out inaccurate information.

Source: Efforts to return British tourists from Sharm el-Sheikh descend into chaos as UK Government rebukes airlines | UK Politics | News | The Independent

It looks like David Cameron decided to steal the march on international aviation experts, relying on intelligence sources, after last week’s air disaster in Egypt. Most UK observers can sympathize with that cautious approach. However, the UK public also expects the government to lead in the evacuation of UK tourists in Egypt.

On the other hand, I have some sympathy with Cameron’s government, the UK travel industry is not particularly well-managed – there’s too much bureaucracy and broken business processes.

Ultimately though, the government must lead.

Thoughts?

10 steps to mental health equality | Comment is free | The Guardian

English: Centre for Mental Health logo

English: Centre for Mental Health logo (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

This article from the Guardian is a must-read. It argues that after public figures signed a letter demanding parity of esteem for mental health care, the author proposes ten things that need to change to end the crisis.

Source: 10 steps to mental health equality | Comment is free | The Guardian

The article is biased and takes a position against the policies of David Cameron’s government.

A casual reader of the article could easily identify with the points raised and superficially conclude that they make sense, therefore the problem is with the UK’s current right-wing government.

Here’s where it gets complicated.

I think the whole of the UK’s political spectrum agree that there’s a crisis in mental health care. Unfortunetely, the viewpoints of politicians and journalists are seriously coloured by their political views.

For me, the problem needs top quality strategic thinking, without bias and spin.

In this blog, John Gelmini and I have repeatedly argued that a strategic approach to the UK’s public health and care needs to be ready to scrap the NHS and the powerful vested interests within it. AND then let’s start again to build a UK best-practice public healthcare system, benchmarked on global best practice.

For sure, more young people are getting mental illnesses and concurrently increasing number of the UK’s elderly are facing dementia. It’s a time bomb and it’s already primed.

 Isn’t it time for the political classes to come clean about UK public health care?

Thoughts?