Britain’s shadow cabinet suffers a mass resignation | The Economist

The Economist pitches in and explores why a string of frontbenchers depart in protest at their leader’s tepid referendum campaign.

Source: Britain’s shadow cabinet suffers a mass resignation | The Economist

The Economist sums up why Corbyn must go, in the interests of both the UK and the Labour Party.

Under Mr Corbyn—who expressed admiration for Hugo Chávez, speaks of “friends” in Hamas and Hizbullah and has appointed a shadow chancellor who lists among his hobbies “fermenting [sic] the overthrow of capitalism”—Labour has ceased to be a credible alternative to the Tories.

Let’s face it, Corbyn’s supporters are from the Socialist Workers’ Party – he’s always been on the far-left of the political spectrum. Remember, for both the far-left and the far-right the end justifies the means. The Labour Party has been hijacked. Tony Blair is right in his brilliant op-ed in the NYT.

Thoughts?

Theresa May and Jeremy Hunt among MPs to halt Boris Johnson and succeed David Cameron | Daily Mail Online

This is an insightful article from the Mail. It reports at least eight leading Tory MPs were scrambling to cut backroom deals to succeed David Cameron last night after his departure from No10 was dramatically brought forward.

Source: Theresa May and Jeremy Hunt among MPs to halt Boris Johnson and succeed David Cameron | Daily Mail Online

With the shortened timetable to appoint a new leader in September, it plays to the two leading candidates, Theresa May and Boris Johnson. At the moment, bookies have Theresa May in the lead. Whilst May will have the support of the Remain camp, plus she is a seasoned minister, she also has the benefit of standing in the last election – this seems to be key as to whether the Conservatives will need to call an early election. Boris has popular appeal  and importantly was the official head of the Brexit campaign but Johnson is untested as a minister, yet alone PM in the UK’s darkest hour since the blitz. Also there are doubts about Johnson’s values, beliefs and personal ambition – for example, alarmingly, Polly Toynbee describes Johnson as a sociopath in today’s Guardian.

Personally, I think the next leader needs to be a trusted, wily heavy-hitter, with exceptional leadership skills, capable of forging a national unity government, if necessary.

Thoughts?