Opinion – Neoliberalism – the ideology at the root of all our problems | Books | The Guardian – George Mobiot – Top Blogs Revisited

I’m reblogging this popular blog because neoliberalism is once again under attack in muddled left-wing argument. Left-wing writers fail to address productivity, skills, investment and financing a larger public sector, especially in the UK, with a smaller national cake post Brexit. Conservative politicians are guilty too, forgetting the successes of Reagan and Thatcher on the back of neoliberal intervention. Now conservative politicians prefer the discredited ‘traditional conservatism‘ or the flaky platform of the neocons.

Source: Opinion – Neoliberalism – the ideology at the root of all our problems | Books | The Guardian – George Mobiot

Surely, it’s time for conservative politicians to stop sitting on their hands? If they don’t have the qualities needed, perhaps it’s time to move aside and give the youngsters a chance?

Public Sector Performance: Catch 22 type Dilemmas – Best Blogs Series

Upside/Downside Leverage

Upside/Downside Leverage (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

English: Protestors in Brighton on June 30 ove...

English: Protestors in Brighton on June 30 over pension changes. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

English: Protestors gather in Sheffield to dem...

English: Protestors gather in Sheffield to demonstrate against government plans to change public sector pensions. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

English: Teachers at New College Nottingham pr...

English: Teachers at New College Nottingham protesting against government pension plans. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

English: NUT ATL UCU PCS strike rally outside ...

English: NUT ATL UCU PCS strike rally outside the Forum in Norwich against draconian government cuts in their pension conditions (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

This is one of my all time best blogs. Although first published in 2011, austerity has failed and radical reform in the public sector will again need addressing. My colleague & fellow blogger, John Gelmini and I were right in 2011 and we’re still right. Since 2011 there’s more downside risk; (1) austerity has failed; (2) there’s a risk of a neo-Marxist government in the UK; (3) Brexit costs will be high to enormous; (4) Conservative government is ‘weak and wobbly’; (5) in North America, the Chair of the Federal Reserve is warning that labor productivity is increasingly being impacted by the epidemic of drug abuse, especially opioids, now the biggest cause of death for the under fifties.

The original article was based on the UK’s unreformed public sector but in Trump’s America, there’s an enormous ‘Catch 22 challenge’ too, as Macron’s France.

Whilst the ‘Catch 22 Challenge’ was originally pitched at the public sector, it also applies to the private sector where productivity is declining apart from the impact of new technology.

So how should the UK and other advanced countries, like France, the US, Canada & Australia face the latest ‘Catch 22 challenge’ in light of new downside risks?

 

Open this link for original 2011 blog

 

Dr Alf's Blog

English: Example of a balanced scorecard strat... English: Example of a balanced scorecard strategy map for a public-sector organization (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

This article was first published on this blog March 11, 2011.

It’s interesting to see what’s changed in nearly five years – not too much I fear.

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Last week’s blog entitled “Local Authorities & Shared Services: Cost-Cutting, Myth or Reality?” generated some lively debate. Reflecting on recent political and media attention the UK Public sector, it occurred to me that perhaps there has been just a bit too much simplification, glossing over complexity and context,  just to score political points.

With over twenty years experience in major multi-nationals, and over five years in the Public Sector, including Central and Local Government, plus International Agencies, I thought that it would be helpful to dispel a few myths. This week, I am going to embellish the content with my own experience. As I introduce new…

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