Triple-drug cocktail could conquer E coli ‘superbug’ | News in brief | Pharmaceutical Journal

Types of Escherichia coli kolicin

Types of Escherichia coli kolicin (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

The  Pharmaceutical Journal reports that a strain of Escherichia coli with immunity to last-resort antibiotics can be destroyed with a novel combination of three existing drugs, citing researchers at the University at Buffalo, New York.

Source: Triple-drug cocktail could conquer E coli ‘superbug’ | News in brief | Pharmaceutical Journal

It’s early days but this is important news.

Low-temperature electron micrograph of a clust...

Low-temperature electron micrograph of a cluster of E. coli bacteria, magnified 10,000 times. Each individual bacterium is oblong shaped. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Over-prescription and less new antibiotics from Big Pharma have signalled risks of returning to the dark ages before antibiotics.

Most people have a friend or family member who goes to a public hospital for a routine procedure and picks up a nasty infection – too many die from complications.

It’s far too easy to come up against the only recommended antibiotic, often with serious side effects.

I have a friend who’s developed a serious infection following a plate inserted in his leg – he’s been in hospital for three months having three hours of intrevenous antibiotics every day,

So how should governments intervene to ensure that there are more effective antibiotics when required?

Thoughts?

DNA confirms cause of 1665 London’s Great Plague – BBC News

English: An illustration of an undertaker duri...

English: An illustration of an undertaker during the Bubonic plague. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

English: This plague patient is displaying a s...

English: This plague patient is displaying a swollen, ruptured inguinal lymph node, or buboe. After the incubation period of 2-6 days, symptoms of the plague appear including severe malaise, headache, shaking chills, fever, and pain and swelling, or adenopathy, in the affected regional lymph nodes, also known as buboes. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

This is an amazing must read story from the BBC. It reports that DNA testing has for the first time confirmed the identity of the bacteria behind the Great Plague of London.

Source: DNA confirms cause of 1665 London’s Great Plague – BBC News

I must admit that I was concerned about the health risks of handling the skeletons of bubonic plague victims. But I was reassured by the last sentence of the article.

Thoughts?