Thousands of tonnes of saturated fat to be taken out of the nation’s diet – Press releases – GOV.UK

Schematic detail of adjoining saturated carbon...

Schematic detail of adjoining saturated carbon atoms. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

 

English: Keep Calm and Carry On UK government ...

English: Keep Calm and Carry On UK government poster (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

 

This press release from the UK’s Department of Health (DOH)  is a MUST READ article in my view. Check it out!

 

via Thousands of tonnes of saturated fat to be taken out of the nation’s diet – Press releases – GOV.UK.

 

As I read the article, my initial reaction was that the DOH should be congratulated on an excellent initiative and then my my pondered the wider social implications.

 

As I read the list of major companies and their products cited in the press release, I got more angry.

 

At the simplest level, I wonder if consumers realize that these products are harmful? Should they contain health warnings like cigarettes?

 

Then I focused on the quantity of saturated fat to be taken from the nation’s diet. What the spin-masters at the DOH failed to identify was whether this represented 1%, 10% or 50% of the nation’s consumption of saturated fat. So my personal conclusion is that the result is probably a compromise following heavy lobbying from the food industry.

 

Let me turn this to an open question:

 

How should the UK Government effectively regulate to eliminate harmful products and substances from the human health chain?

Health

Health (Photo credit: 401(K) 2013)

 

Any thoughts?

 

 

 

 

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BBC News – Surgery ‘has growing death risk through the week’

Deutsch: Logo des Fernsehsenders BBC World News.

Deutsch: Logo des Fernsehsenders BBC World News. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

This is a MUST READ story from the BBC, highlighting latest medical research in the UK published in the British Medical Journal. Check it out!

BBC News – Surgery ‘has growing death risk through the week’.

The research concludes that it is more dangerous to have elective surgery at the end of the week because levels of aftercare at the weekend may be seriously reduced.

In my mind. there is a case for the UK’s  National Health Service (NHS) to renegotiate ALL contracts for doctors, nurses and care workers introducing flexible rostering spreading the work load over weekends and at nights more effectively.

Any thoughts?

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