Opinion – Theresa May Expels Russian Diplomats. But Now Comes the Hard Part – NYT – John Gelmini

Vladimir Putin

Vladimir Putin (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Dr Alf is right.

The reality is that the poisoned ex spy was tried and then poisoned a long time ago, so the question then is who benefits all these years later from the poisoning of him, his daughter and the hapless British policeman.

We do not know but Mrs May whose political position is precarious and has the answer.
She has at best an 18 month shelf life and her measures against Russia will not work.
Expelling a few diplomats simply triggers a reciprocal response, freezing bank accounts of oligarchs simply gets those who have assets elsewhere to move them further offshore to tax havens not controlled by the UK.

Militarily, we have an army not much bigger than the Papal Guard, no coastal protection vessel, just 17 escort vessels for our shipping and less than 12000 cyber warriors, compared to 2 million in the GRU, and 5 million in Russia’s ally, the Chinese People’s Liberation Army.

We will want Russia’s assistance with the final settlement in Syria and we cannot survive as a modern economy without chromium. 75% of the world’s chrome comes from Russia and South Africa, so in a world where Vladimir Putin can tell South African Government ministers which ones to appoint and fire, whether we like it or not we have to deal with Vladimir Putin.

Mrs May has been out foxed and outclassed at every turn, so it is time we replaced her with a smarter operator along with her lacklustre cabinet. Before strutting about and calling people out, it is best to hold some high cards and be in a position to apply pressure that is effective. The UK is not in that position and Mrs May goes on making a fool of herself and making the country look stupid.

John Gelmini

Opinion – High number of adults unable to do basic mathematical tasks – The Conversation

This article published by The Conversation is alarming. UNESCO reports that third world education is improving, yet in pockets of the developed world, basic numeracy seems on the decline. This was brought home to my wife and I recently on a trip to the UK. In a charity shop, we wanted to purchase four items at GBP0.99 – it look the young, articulate and attractive sales assistant ages to let us know that the cost was GBP3.96. She insisted on using a machine for the calculation. When we told her the mathematical short-cut, she was amazed. It’s not clear to me whether the problem is quality of education or a wider cultural problem with too much dependence on machines. Any thoughts?