Opinion – UK race-disparity audit: Theresa May’s government has put Britain’s inequality on display — Quartz

This is an interesting read. Theresa May‘s government launches a website that offers a complex picture of life for different ethnicities.

Source: UK race-disparity audit: Theresa May’s government has put Britain’s inequality on display — Quartz

Personally, I found the data rather sterile. It needs a rolling commentary to highlight the major findings by theme/ethnicity.

The data is esentially descriptive and does not readily facilitate further analysis.

For meaningful analysis, access to the full data set is required, ideally showing key demographic details like:

Theresa May and David Cameron before her, have tried to provide greater data to facilitate policy decisions. Unfortunately, I fear that this latest data will do little to improve the underlying policies.

There’s a risk here of journalists dipping into the database and cherry-picking their data to embellish a headline.

Ethnicity is a complex subject and without expert commentary, and detailed data sets, it’s not clear how this initiative will help faciltate policy changes.

Thoughts?

Most people do not believe the Tories are on their side. My party has to change | Phillip Lee MP | Opinion | The Guardian

Conservative Party (UK)

Conservative Party (UK) (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Here’s a good op-ed, published in the Guardian/Observer. On the eve of the his party’s conference, a Conservative MP calls for a new vision to recapture support across all ages.

Source: Most people do not believe the Tories are on their side. My party has to change | Phillip Lee | Opinion | The Guardian

Whilst there’s nothing fundamentally wrong with this article, it’s far too weak in my view. With Boris Johnson about to make a leadership bid, the Conservative Party is once again dominated by ‘traditional conservatives’, and the radical reformers are in the wilderness. So far, the Cameron/May years have been squandered, with the rich and privileged going from strength to strength.

I’ve always been a one-nation conservative in the Disraeli tradition but my left-wing friends tell me that one-nation tories are rare beasts these days.

Personally, I can’t see the Conservative Party appealing to younger voters in the next election. But the first step is surely a new leader, with the appeal to win the younger vote?

Thoughts?