Health policies and data – Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development

English: Human Development Index trends shown ...

English: Human Development Index trends shown between 1975 and 2004. Each line represents a geographical area or international organisation. Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development Central and eastern Europe, and the Commonwealth of Independent States Latin America and the Caribbean East Asia Arab States South Asia Sub-Saharan Africa (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

This is a MUST READ article from the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD).

via Health policies and data – Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development.

OECD provide best-practice, and bench-marking by country for health policies.

Take a look at the data and you will see that the UK’s record is worse than many developing countries, it’s real, bottom-quartile stuff, in places.

This comes out as the  UK Health Minister is ordered to come clean about plans to redress the UK’s healthcare crisis. Meanwhile, at the same time the UK’s Department of Health (DoH) is pumping out to the media data that is irrelevant to the UK’s widely predicted healthcare melt-down this Winter.

Why isn’t the UK media getting across that the UK’s National Health Service is in final melt-down territory and recommending the scrapping of the NHS, replacing it with a best-practice public healthcare system modeled on say Germany, France or Italy?

Any thoughts?

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Why Are the Wealthier Healthier? by Clare Bambra – Project Syndicate

Health

Health (Photo credit: Tax Credits)

This is an interesting article written by Clare Bambra and published by Project Syndicate. It’s a RECOMMENDED READ, in my view. Check it out!

via Why Are the Wealthier Healthier? by Clare Bambra – Project Syndicate.

The author, Clare Bambra is Professor of Public Health Policy and Director of the Wolfson Research Institute for Health and Wellbeing at Durham University, United Kingdom.

I am not sure that I entirely agree with the thrust of this article. Since the introduction of the National Health Service, a common standard of free healthcare is available across the population, yet the lower social classes typically have more health problems. Reasons often cited include lifestyle, diet and perhaps even laziness, preferring to rely on a diet of convenience and junk food.

Surely, individuals must help themselves, as well?

Any thoughts?

via Why Are the Wealthier Healthier? by Clare Bambra – Project Syndicate.

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