How HS2 will tear up rural England – Telegraph

English: Lord Mandelson

English: Lord Mandelson (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

This is an important MUST READ article from the Telegraph.

via How HS2 will tear up rural England – Telegraph.

Personally, I agree with Lord Mandelson that the business case should be revisited.

In my view, the whole business case, including cost benefit analysis, risk/mitigation analysis, and environmental impact needs to be subjected to to rigorous independent review and public debate. It’s not enough to leave the judgement to the politicians, the bureaucrats and their usual group of tame consultants.

Let me turn it around as an open question:

Should there be a moratorium on development of the HS2 until the business case and environmental impact has been independently reviewed, with proper public debate?

Any thoughts?

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Lord Mandelson warns HS2 will be an ‘expensive mistake’ | UK news | The Guardian

English: Lord Mandelson

English: Lord Mandelson (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

This is an amazing, MUST READ, article in the Guardian. Check it out!

Lord Mandelson warns HS2 will be an ‘expensive mistake’ | UK news | The Guardian.

Lord Mandelson, former Labour, Business Secretary, is the latest, high-profile advocate of the scrapping of the HS2 rail program. The project is already billions over budget, even before construction has been started. Amazingly, there was not a proper business case that looked effectively at the opportunity cost of alternative major development programs and their social benefits.

With the UK in a self-imposed crisis because of David Cameron‘s excessive austerity, the IMF, as well as many prominent economists, have called for the UK to seriously increase infrastructure investment. Unfortunately, based upon HS2, it is evident, once again, that the Government is unable to manage effectively major investment programs; this is a long-standing problem highlighted by the Public Accounts Committee many, many times.

Part of the cause of the problem is as follows:

  • Too much political meddling in major projects and dependence upon cronies
  • Too much dependence upon consultants from major consulting practices
  • Ineffective governance
  • Inadequate deployment of expert, independent consultants
  • Because of austerity, the most capable and talented people are looking to careers outside the Public Sector or overseas

Any thoughts?

 

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