Lunch with the FT: Sir Mervyn King – Martin Wolf – FT.com

DALIAN/CHINA, 12SEPT09 - Martin Wolf, Associat...

DALIAN/CHINA, 12SEPT09 – Martin Wolf, Associate Editor and Chief Economics Commentator, The Financial Times. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

The Bank of England in Threadneedle Street, Lo...

The Bank of England in Threadneedle Street, London. Deutsch: Sitz der Bank von England in der Londoner Threadneedle Street. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

This is an excellent an HIGHLY RECOMMENDED READ where Martin Wolf, the FT’s chief economics advisor talks over lunch to Sir Mervyn King, the outgoing head of the Bank of England. Check it out!

via Lunch with the FT: Sir Mervyn King – Martin Wolf – FT.com.

It was a very enjoyable read but I found Sir Mervyn’s four options for the Eurozone a useful reminder that these four options are more about political rather than economic choices.

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What will happen to markets when QE ends? | FT – Gavyn Davies

Bank of England

Bank of England (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

This is an excellent article from the respected macro-economist, Gavyn Davies, writing in his FT blog. If you are financially literate, it is well worth a read. Check it out!

via What will happen to markets when QE ends? | Gavyn Davies.

My simple conclusion from reading the article is that we should not necessarily expect markets to crash when QE ends (quantitative easing); there will obviously be a period of adjustment as highlighted by Mervyn King, outgoing head of the Bank of England. However, in my view, by the time QE ends, economic fundamentals will be on a stronger footing. This is good news.

Hopefully, major corporations will start to invest some of their piles of cash soon? When big corporations start investing in major capital spending and acquisitions, it will filter through the economic food chain and hopefully create jobs and give unemployed young people renewed confidence and hope; for many, capitalism is still on trial.

At the moment there is a major disconnect between those with financial assets and those dependent upon wages and salaries. The first group, let’s call them the “wealthy” are doing surprisingly well on the bull-run in financial markets; meanwhile, the second group, we can call them the “workers” are squeezed by austerity measures in the US, the UK and the Eurozone – the “workers” are also being squeezed by non-availability of  low-cost credit.

For me, it is time for the benefits to be shared. I am not talking about redistribution from the “wealthy” to the “workers”, like in Francois Hollande’s France. I am referring to fiscal stimulation and deferring austerity a little; watch the US, the UK and Germany; they will lead and others will follow and share the benefits.

Any thoughts?

The Bank of England in Threadneedle Street, Lo...

The Bank of England in Threadneedle Street, London. Deutsch: Sitz der Bank von England in der Londoner Threadneedle Street. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

 

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