Election manifestos: In Britain, the state is back | The Economist

A ballot box with a current event-clock

A ballot box with a current event-clock (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

This is an excellent read from the Economist. It reports that the three main parties are proposing very different policies. Yet it argues that they have a common thread: a more intrusive role for government

Election manifestos: In Britain, the state is back | The Economist

This is by far the best comparison of alternative policies that I have read so far.

What alarms me though is the overwhelming absence of strategy, detailed costings and risk analysis. May still looks set to win the election but the consequences of her policies will be felt for generations.

As a passionate believer in individualism with effective social nets, I believe that the Conservative Party Manifesto 2017 has lost its way, without an overarching strategy, just different flavours of jam for UKIP and Labour supporters. It’s a sham.

Is Theresa May just a wolf in sheep’s clothing?

Thoughts?

‘No deal is better than a bad deal’ claim unsubstantiated – News from Parliament – UK Parliament

English: Risk Assessment Methodology Flowchart...

English: Risk Assessment Methodology Flowchart showing different steps, input and output of this steps (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Don’t rely on the heavily biased British media, read the minutes of the Brexit Parliamentary Select Committee. Significantly, it reports that the Government has not carried out economic assessment of ‘no deal’.

Source: ‘No deal is better than a bad deal’ claim unsubstantiated – News from Parliament – UK Parliament

There are two interpretations. Firstly, the Government has risk assessed the downside-risk of a ‘no-deal’ and recognized that it’s political and economic suicide, so they’ve buried it, shot the messenger or sent author back to rework his sums. Secondly, the Government has been negligent and ignored strategic best practice and risk assessment tools (see flow chart). Either way, Theresa May and her government are looking a bit flakey right now and liberal observers will be alarmed at the march to the right of the political spectrum.

Whatever you may think of individual members of the parliamentary select committee, their views are increasingly important.

Thoughts?