EPC Publications | Towards a sustainable European economy by Toutia Daryoush, Annika Hedberg (formerly Ahtonen) and Romain Pardo

English: Diagram showing aspects of sustainabl...

English: Diagram showing aspects of sustainable development as Ecology, Economy and Society bounded by Environment (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Annika Hedberg, Romain Pardo and Toutia Daryoush argue that, in order to address the interlinked economic, ecological and climate crises, the EU should make a transition to a sustainable economy its overriding policy objective.

Source: EPC Publications | Towards a sustainable European economy by Toutia Daryoush, Annika Hedberg (formerly Ahtonen) and Romain Pardo

This paper published by think-tank, the European Policy Center, makes a number of good points. However, I sense that the authors as well as the EU have a deep bias towards sustainable development.

I too have a passionate interest in the environment and protecting it for future generations. However, I worry deeply that the European policy-makers and their advisors are missing the plot.

Surely, the overall priority has to be a cohesive strategy, with an effective delivery plan?

As a specialist in delivery strategy, in my judgement sustainable development should be a goal that is subordinated to effective strategy?

Thoughts?

Sustainable Development – From Growth to Inclusive Green Growth: The Economics of Sustainable Development – World Bank

English: Sustainability chart

English: Sustainability chart (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

This is an excellent and highly recommended read published by the World Bank. Check it out!

via Sustainable Development – From Growth to Inclusive Green Growth: The Economics of Sustainable Development.

For me, the World Bank article was excellent in stating blue-sky vision but failed to address the contextual challenge effectively. Tradition economic and political factors effectively conspire against the vision namely:

Neglecting natural capital, like neglecting  human and physical capital, is bad economics and bad for growth.

Since 2008, World leaders have effectively ignored human capital, so green issues have been further subordinated. In many economies like Southern Europe, the UK and the US, human capital has suffered severely from excessive austerity.

Personally, I support sustainable development and this year have seen first hand in Malaysia, for example, the environmental consequences of a country ravaged by greed.

Any thoughts?

 

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