Theresa May to call for unity, equality and successful exit from EU | Politics | The Guardian

The Guardian reports that Theresa May, the Tory leadership candidate, says she wants more accountability for big business, with workers on company boards and annual shareholder votes on executive pay

Source: Theresa May to call for unity, equality and successful exit from EU | Politics | The Guardian

As a one-nation conservative, I support Theresa May’s initiatives. Much of my career was in continental Europe and I am very familiar with wider representation on corporate boards. By comparison, boards of major corporations in the UK and the US are composed of two groups, executive directors who typically support the chief executive and non-executives. Non-executives are from a narrow group, supported by financial institutions and frequently have a series of interlocking directorships.

Theresa May will widen the appeal of the Conservative Party, which will heighten their chances of re-election – this is especially so with the Labour Party fighting for its future with its own leadership context now that Angela Eagle is formally challenging for the leadership.

Meanwhile, Andrea Neadsom, the other Tory candidate continues to be embroiled in controversy and is seen increasingly as divisive, inexperienced and hasty.

I sense that Theresa May needs to reach out to some top Brexit campaigners and be ready to include them prominently in her government. In return, they must endorse May publicly for the benefit of the Tory membership.

Thoughts?

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Kenneth Rogoff: Brexit is an example of democratic failure | World Economic Forum

Economic Counsellor Kenneth Rogoff

Economic Counsellor Kenneth Rogoff (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Brexit requires a complete rethinking on how decisions are made in a country, argues a Harvard economics professor in this hard-hitting WEF article.

Source: Kenneth Rogoff: Brexit is an example of democratic failure | World Economic Forum

For sure, David Cameron made a catastrophic error of judgement. For the moment, Cameron is still in power and his government have rejected calls of a second referendum despite a petition from 4 million voters.

Given the UK absence of formal constitution, there are serious questions over whether a prime minister with the support of cabinet can authorize the triggering of Article 50, initiating formal Brexit talks.

Meanwhile, the Independent reports that a date has been set for the first legal trial to stop article 50 being triggered by Prime Minister.

UK MPs need to protect the sovereignty of parliament otherwise they are ready for the scrap-heap. Of course, some MPs will find that they need to stand up to popular power in their constituencies.

So perhaps the great British legal system will prove Rogoff wrong?

Thoughts?